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The color of education

AFRICAN-AMERICAN SCHOOLS IN ALAMANCE, NC

African-American education experienced vast amounts of change over the course of the 20th Century. 

 

The United States Supreme Court decision in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case established the “separate but equal” doctrine that allowed racial segregation in public spaces, as long as the two sets of spaces were of equal quality. This ruling is what allowed segregation in education to continue until the famous 1954 decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education trial, which declared segregation in public schools to be unconstitutional. However, the schools in North Carolina would not meet the federal desegregation standards until 1971, seventeen years after the Supreme Court ruling.

 

Grassroots action was often required to create satisfactory schools for the local African-American community. Funds were often raised to build schools in the area or to match the donations of educational initiatives to help with the construction of schools.

 

The Color of Education primarily focuses on the McCray School, a rural school house in Alamance county; the Rosenwald Fund, which contributed to the education of approximately one-third of African-Americans in the southern states; community life and conditions in segregated schools; and the experience of desegregation in North Carolina.

THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN SCHOOLS THAT SHAPED THE COMMUNITY

MCCRAY SCHOOL

The McCray School was built between 1915-1919. It was the first school for African-American students in Alamance County.

JORDAN SELLARS 

Jordan Sellars (now Sellars-Gunn) was one of the largest African-American schools in the county.

Central

Central High School became Graham High School when Alamance county finally began to desegregate in 1969.

The McCray School was built between 1915-1919. It was the first school for African-American students in Alamance County.

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Jordan Sellars (now Sellars-Gunn) was one of the largest African-American schools in the county.

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Central High School became Graham High School when Alamance county finally began to desegregate in 1969.

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The McCray School was built between 1915-1919. It was the first school for African-American students in Alamance County.

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Timeline

This timeline features some of the historical moments in Alamance county and the United States that affected the African-American community. Some of the dates include the Supreme Court case that allowed segregation, the Rosenwald Fund that built thousands of schools for African-Americans, and more.

Plessy v Ferguson

Rosenwald Fund Established

McCray School

The first Rosenwald schools were established in Alamance county

Graham School

Alamance Training School

Pleasant Grove School

End of Rosenwald funding for new school building

Brown v Board of Education

Alamance county schools desegregate

The last schools in North Carolina desegregate